Colorado Pioneers

Sand Creek a Decisive Battle

Turning over the pages of history we find from beginning to end battles that must decide the progress of civilization, whether it was to raise to the highest standard of mankind or fall into the lowest depths of barbarism. The following are a few of the deciding battles that have been handed down through the annals of time. Going back to 490 B. C, we find the battle of Marathon, where the Athenians won the victory over the Persians on the Plains of Marathon. Thus changing the course of early history. The defeat of the Athenians at Syracuse, 413 B. …

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Red Bead, Roberts and the Comanches

Red Bead, a chief, was at Fort Sedgwick, under the protection of the officers in charge. He had won the entire confidence of all at the fort, and at the same time had secret communications with the hostile tribes. On one occasion Lieutenant Kidder and ten soldiers were sent out to intercept General Custer on his route and deliver some orders. Red Bead said he knew the way and asked to go as their guide. The officers consented. Some time afterwards the bodies of the Lieutenant and his ten men were found near Custer’s route. Six months later Red Bead …

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Raid up the Platte

As we came over the road to Denver, we noticed many ruins of what had been feed stations. This was caused by a general attack on every ranch from Fort Morgan to Fort Sedgwick, a distance of one hundred miles, by from two hundred and fifty to five hundred Indians to each ranch. The attack occurred on the morning of the fourteenth day of January, 1865. These feed ranches or stations were situated about twelve miles apart, a half day’s travel, to accommodate the overland travel with such supplies they often ran short of. Every ranch, together with its stables …

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Proceedings of Company C

Company “C” of the 3rd Regiment of Colorado Volunteers was mustered in at Denver, under Captain Morgan and Lieutenants Weld and Wyman. They were then marched down the Platte river, a mile and a half below Denver, where they camped about two weeks. Their next move was down the Platte about thirty-five or forty miles to Lathrum. While camped here they had some Indian excitements. Old Friday, a chief of a band of peaceful Indians, whose village was near Fort Collins, was a friend of the white people and always warned them and kept them posted on the moves of …

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Proceedings of Company A

Company “A” under Captain Theodore Cree and Lieutenants Charles Cass and Al Soper was mustered in at Denver and ordered to go down the Fountain River and take Jim Reynolds and his gang with them. It has been stated in a previous chapter how the regiment disposed of the prisoners. The Company moved on south, following the old Squirrel Creek road to Colorado City. Here the soldiers were divided into small squads and stationed along the Fountain road from Colorado City to the present site of Pueblo, to protect the settlers and guard the United States mail. During the stop …

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The Pioneers – A Poem

Come, you children of the pioneers, And join me in their praise; et us shout three rousing cheers, To awake the memory of their frays. Our fathers, they came to the land Of redskins and buffalo, And took a firm, steadfast stand, To rid the country of its foe. Some were settlers, others were scouts, All aiming to build up the frontier And run the redskins out, Who were scalping all, far and near. They suffered privations and hardships, These stronghearted men of the wild, As they made their many trips Over the prairie, but not once defiled. Though unseen …

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Mexican Peter Arrago

A train of wagons was making its way to Montana, in June, 1866, and one night they camped by my place and put two Mexicans on night guard. Late in the night one of the Mexicans mistook the other for an Indian and fired at him. The shot nearly tore his arm off and severely lacerated his chest. The commander of the train asked me to take him and care for him and make him as comfortable as I could and see that he was properly buried, for none of us expected to see him recover. After offering to pay …

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Massacre of the Hungate Family

In June, 1863, just before the call for volunteers to subdue the Indians, Isaac P. Vanwomer had his cattle and horses on the range in the Coal creek country. Hungate, with his family and five hired men, were living at the Vanwomer camp, as Hungate was looking after the cattle and horses. About four o’clock one afternoon, Hungate and his men were on the west side of the creek when the Indians attacked the cabin. Knowing that his wife and children were in the cabin alone, Mr. Hungate hurried across to their aid, but was too late, as the Indians …

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Massacre at Fort Phil Kearney

  Colonel Carrington was in command of four hundred men at Fort Phil Kearney, where they were being tantalized by the Indians. Chief Red Cloud, ranking chief of the war council, sent about sixty warriors down near the fort to tantalize the soldiers into leaving the fort and start to fighting. At last Colonel Carrington ordered Captain Fetterman and his company of ninety-two men to go out and run the Indians back into the hills. The Indians kept backing up toward the canon, about a mile from the fort. A scout, who was in the company, thought the Indians had …

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March to Fort Larnard

On the afternoon of December the tenth, 1864, the day after the fight, the command was ordered out to follow the Indians of Little Raven’s band down on the Arkansas. The soldiers broke camp and started down Sand Creek until reaching the Arkansas, then they followed down it on forced march. Flynn Loogstrum’s horse gave out, so he waited for Captain Cree to come along, “Say, Captain, my horse has played out, got another one?” “No, we haven’t, and can’t get one now; you will have to fall in behind.” “Gosh! Believe I can walk and keep up with this …

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